A Wicked Junkee Review: Top Ten Reasons This Book Blows

  1. The book’s supposed purpose is to show reverse racism, but it turns out that it is sorta racist in itself. You know the kind of sorta racism that says, “I have a black friend! I can’t be racist!” and “I voted for Barrack Obama, I can’t be racist!” That sort of kinda racist.
  2. The first book was so bad that only about ten people actually bought the second book. Or so it seems from reviews on Amazon. (There are eight – six of which look like sock-puppet accounts).
  3. It’s really hard to read a failed / ignorant attempt at a message…
  4. The author calls white people “Pearls” and black people “Coals” like it is an insult/compliment. Last time I checked a Pearl is precious and Coal is rather funky. You know – you get it in your stocking if you make the naughty list. SMH at that bit of intelligence. Because the author thought it was an intelligent classification, justifying her names by saying coal is useful in a dystopian environment. Might I suggest seedling? Seedlings are dark in color and are very useful … right?
  5. The author expects us to believe this world she created, but doesn’t back it up with anything. She just claims it. “It is what it is…because…” White people are rare because the sun kills them off – because you know, the sun – black people are immune to the sun, whereas white are basically vampires who shrivel and die under intense UV rays.
  6. There are no likable characters within this book.
  7. The only character of any substance is the main character. A special white snowflake amidst a sea of black “beast” savages – where she is forced to wear a “blackface” to fit in with these savages. And it’s supposed to turn racism around? It reads like a scared white woman’s nightmare of the bleak future world.
  8. The entire point of this novel is to shed light on racism, but the main character is a blond, pale skinned, female.
  9. The dainty blonde female “rides her beast” boyfriend and guides him through the forest with her thighs wrapped around his head in some bizarre situation that is both disturbingly inappropriate for YA and also very ridiculous in nature.
  10. If this is supposed to be satire, I must be an idiot, because I didn’t get it. But, since my ego is ridiculously inflated and I never doubt my smartness, if it is satire, it was really sucky satire.
Ten Reason Not to Read Revealing Eden (Save the Pearls Part One) by Victoria Foyt

Revealing Eden by Victoria Foyt

Series: Save the Pearls #1
Published by Sand Dollar Press, Incorporated on 2012-01
Genres: Dystopian, Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 307
 Stars

Eden Newman must mate before her 18th birthday in six months or she will be left outside to die in a burning world. But who will pick up her mate-option when she's cursed with white skin and a tragically low mate-rate of 15%? In a post-apocalyptic, totalitarian, underground world where class and beauty are defined by resistance to an overheated environment, Eden's colouring brands her as a member of the lowest class, a weak and ugly Pearl. If only she can mate with a dark-skinned Coal from the ruling class, she'll be safe. Just maybe one Coal sees the Real Eden and will be her salvation her co-worker Jamal has begun secretly dating her. But when Eden unwittingly compromises her father's secret biological experiment, she finds herself in the eye of a storm and thrown into the last area of rainforest, a strange and dangerous land. Eden must fight to save her father, who may be humanity's last hope, while standing up to a powerful beast-man she believes is her enemy, despite her overwhelming attraction. Eden must change to survive but only if she can redefine her ideas of beauty and of love, along with a little help from her




Eden Newman must mate before her 18th birthday in six months or she’ll be left outside to die in a burning world. But who will pick up her mate-option when she’s cursed with white skin and a tragically low mate-rate of 15%? In a post-apocalyptic, totalitarian, underground world where class and beauty are defined by resistance to an overheated environment, Eden’s coloring brands her as a member of the lowest class, a weak and ugly Pearl. If only she can mate with a dark-skinned Coal from the ruling class, she’ll be safe. Just maybe one Coal sees the Real Eden and will be her salvation her co-worker Jamal has begun secretly dating her. But when Eden unwittingly compromises her father’s secret biological experiment, she finds herself in the eye of a storm and thrown into the last area of rainforest, a strange and dangerous land. Eden must fight to save her father, who may be humanity’s last hope, while standing up to a powerful beast-man she believes is her enemy, despite her overwhelming attraction. Eden must change to survive but only if she can redefine her ideas of beauty and of love, along with a little help from her “adopted aunt” Emily Dickinson.